Edwin L. Green, Artist

 

 

Photo: Peter Wooten

Port Perry, Ontario

(905) 985-8885

                                             

                                                         

                                                        

For a  plein air painter, everything is a relevant subject and diversity of experience is a decided asset. Truer words could not be found to describe this artist, who enjoys nothing more than packing up his paints and easel for a day working locally or in nearby Colonial Williamsburg.

Boyhood spent in South Carolina paddling an Old Town canoe he restored or hiking the Smokies with a biologist father. Philosophy and French were undergraduate majors; an advanced degree from UNC-Chapel Hill in Classics (Greek and Latin). Certificates from the universities of Dijon and Montpellier, France. A career teaching in private and public schools allowed summers in Maine as a Whitewater and Rock-climbing Specialist for the Hurricane Island Outward Bound School. Other work included running the canoe-rig for Chesapeake Bay Foundation. A USCG Master's license made possible a stint as sailboat delivery captain worldwide. Other activities have ranged from hiking the Appalachian and Long Trails end-to-end, biking the Oregon Trail and across France, to living aboard a sailboat for twelve years while sailing and painting all over the world. The violin and viola were an interest for years, but a recent fascination with classical guitar occupies leisure time. Toano,VA (near Williamsburg) is home now with wife Isabelle and three cats.

Art has been a lifelong pursuit. The inspiration of an extended stay in Villefranche S/M in the early 60's where Cocteau and Matisse did so much fine work, the study in Dijon and Montpellier with their wonderful museums and university offerings, the frequent trips over the years to Paris, the Loire Valley and the Midi, and to Italy and Greece - the Mediterranean periploi, and not least, the core Studio Art Program at Virginia Commonwealth University, all have fueled this passion.  Serious brush to canvas painting revived long ago in Sri Lanka on a sailing trip from Bali to Cyprus. It has continued without interruption to the present. Sailing has always offered the means for visiting interesting places to paint and for gleaning new ideas. Until recently cruising the coast of Maine in our 36' Cheoy Lee cutter rigged sloop, Arke, provided a respite from southern summers. Now day-sailing on the Chesapeake Bay is a pleasant enough diversion to quell any serious wanderlust.  To escape harsh winter weather Key West and Charleston, SC offer familiar places where watercolors mostly do not freeze.

The preservation of Hunterstown, PA, both for its quaintness and the important,but little known, role it played in the Gettysburg campaign has become an important cause for me. The conflict there between Custer and Wade Hampton was key to the Southern failure to guard the approaches to Culp's Hill and the subsequent Union control of Cemetery Ridge. I have done a series of watercolors of the Civil War era buildings in the town to draw attention to this importance (see Hunterstown Prints).

Travel is always an education in itself. Below are links to various places visited and the resulting paintings. Some paintings are available as are prints in most cases:

Pisgah:       Maine:       Provence:       Santo Domingo       Key West

Mt. Rogers       Adirondacks         Wyoming          Lewis and Clark

 Charleston Originals          Charleston Prints

 

Whether working in Williamsburg or France or Charleston - wherever, painting en plein air has a way of capturing one's soul; every effort is made to work outside each day. The tidewater area offers a true opportunity for any artist: the wealth of subject matter endless, the beauty ever changing. No lifetime could  capture it all.

Painting in the Cour Godeau -Vence, France

September 2009

The column is Roman 2nd Century AD - one of two given by the city of

Marseille to Vence. It is dedicated to the god Mars Vintium. Vintium

becomes Vincium in French before the Latin ending is dropped. In French

the mute -e often indicates the loss of a Latin ending - hence Vence).

Look closely at the painting I am working on. It is of a XIII century

fenetre jumelee. Doesn't it remind you of Romeo and Juliet?

Edwin L. Green, Artist

P. O. Box 744    Toano, Virginia  23168

Phone (757) 566-1582

email:  elgreenart@gmail.com

 

Copyright 2016  Edwin L. Green   All rights reserved  Digital Watermark protection